Witches Weekly

Witches Weekly for July 10, 2004 — Pagan Community

1. How did you choose the specific path you’re on? (Druid, Wiccan, Sumerian…)

Choose? Sometimes I feel as if I’ve been railroaded into it, and all the while Spirit was snickering up its sleeve.

The story’s been told before. Namely, I was doing research for a character whom I decided would be a modern witch, and rather than making it all up I chose to visit the local metaphysical shop and pick up a couple of introductory books. The rest, says the author/priestess/teacher, is history.

Come to think of it, I did the same sort of research on ferrets last November for my NaNo novel, but I didn’t become a ferret fan. Any more than I already am, that is. Ferrets are a nice idea, but too fast and nippy in person for my taste.

(For a more detailed answer to this question, visit the Owldaughter: Believe page.)

2. What do you feel you contribute to the pagan community?

Ahem. I’m a once-bitten type of girl, which means that I stuck my neck out in the Montreal pagan community about four or five years ago, and was disgusted with the hypocrisy which abounds. I was one of the four original founders of the Montreal Pagan Resource Centre, which is still going strong. It was the first pagan resource centre in Canada. I got tired of the community backbiting the people who were attempting to provide a common space and ground where everyone could meet, and resigned two years later. (Tangent: The amount of political crap that goes on in the Montreal pagan community never ceases to amaze me, however. It whines and moans about the lack of community, then snaps and backstabs any attempt at community support. I once told an interviewer that the Montreal pagan community eats its young. It’s a curious truth. End tangent.) For the past four years now I have taught a four-level program which studies a broad spectrum of comparative religion over the ages (N.B.: this is not a spiritual path; it’s a survey program which examines techniques and beliefs of various cultures). I also write articles and reviews for our local pagan journal, and I think my editing of the New Age imprint counts as well. For the first time I’ve realised that I’m a part of an international community as well as my local community, and I try to lead by example.

3. How long have you been an active member of the pagan community?
I never really hid what I was; after all, it’s a spiritual path, and frankly it’s nobody’s business. I became unmistakeably part of the Montreal community when I began to work in the city’s largest and oldest metaphysical shop. It’s hard to deny that you’re not part of the community when you’re immersed in it every day.

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